The New York Times Cites DAG Media as Challenge To Bell Atlantic's Yellow Pages Dominance in Manhattan


NEW YORK, Nov. 10 /PRNewswire/ -- DAG Media Inc. (Nasdaq: DAGM - news), the leading independent print and on-line publisher of yellow pages directories, was cited in The New York Times (11/10/99) as one of three companies looking to challenge Bell Atlantic's long dominance in yellow pages in the Manhattan market.

The article, ``Look Out Bell Atlantic -- Here Come Challengers To Your Dominance of Manhattan's Yellow Pages,'' said that DAG Media, which specializes in directories for the Jewish market, will publish New Yellow, its first Manhattan yellow pages next March, which will be geared to the general market. The article appeared in The New York Times advertising column.

The Kelsey Group, a consulting firm in Princeton, N.J. said that of the $12 billion in yellow pages advertising generated in 1998, independent publishers accounted for $1 billion. Print advertising sales of independent publishers have jumped 15 percent to 20 percent annually the last few years, while those of the regional Bell companies have increased only four percent to six percent, John Kelsey, the president of the Kelsey Group, told The New York Times.

The independent publishers view Manhattan -- where yellow pages ad sales totaled $100 million last year, as ripe for invasion because of what they describe as Bell Atlantic's high rates.

Assaf Ran, founder and CEO, of DAG Media told The New York Times the rates for the directory, which will offer special discounts for users who do business with its advertisers, will run 70% below those of Bell Atlantic. DAG Media will distribute 900,000 copies of New Yellow in March.

DAG Media has seven sales offices including three new offices. Two are dedicated to New Yellow, a general interest yellow pages directory that is challenging the monopoly of the Bell Atlantic Yellow Pages in the New York market. One other sales office is dedicated to Jewish-Israeli Yellow Pages.

 

Back to the Press Releases